10 reasons why you should not neuter your male dog

10 Good Reasons You Should Not Neuter Your Male Dog

Pet parents are strongly advised to spay/neuter their puppies and kittens as early as possible for health reasons and behavior and population control. But, how valid are these alleged risks for neutering and spaying our pets? 

Reading 10 Good Reasons You Should Not Neuter Your Male Dog 8 minutes Next Detoxification for Dogs and Cats

Pet parents are strongly advised to spay/neuter their puppies and kittens as early as possible for health reasons and behavior and population control. Most responsible people living with pets believe neutering and spaying is important to reduce the risk of certain diseases or to avoid contributing to homeless animals due to free mating.

But, how valid are these reasons for neutering and spaying our dogs? Are there health risks or benefits to waiting for our animals to age, not spaying/neutering at all, or alternative surgeries?

The evidence for preventing future health problems with neutering is unclear.

With many retrospective studies to date, there is no clear evidence indicating the neutering male dogs, especially young male dogs, will prevent future health issues.

In fact, the negative health issues far exceed the benefits when it comes to early neutering/spaying.

The following information is taken from an extensive meta-analysis preformed by Laura J. Sanborn, M.S. in 2007. All the references are listed at the end of her analysis. 

What health benefit is there to neutering male dogs?

Starting with the benefits for neutering male dogs, the procedure eliminates the small risk (<1%) of developing testicular cancer. However, this is an uncommon, very treatable disease with a high incidence of cure. Neutering may possibly reduce the risk of non-cancerous prostate disorders, perianal fistulas, and  diabetes (data inconclusive).

10 Reasons Neutering Your MALE Dog Negatively Impacts His Health

#1: Most pets are neutered prior to their first year of age which disrupts proper hormonal processes. Removing the hormone generating organs of the body at early ages (less than 6 months) will impact other essential growth processes such as the development of bones, brain and intelligence, immune system, muscle size, as well as the overall health of the dogs.

#2: Hormonal disruption in neutered male dogs heightens the risk of other organ failure or malfunction. Neutering may triple the risk of hypothyroidism.

#3: Early neutering of male dogs increases the risk of developing bone cancer. Osteosarcoma is a common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.

#4: Male dogs who are neutered are more likely to develop other orthopedic diseases. The potential for hip dysplasia and cruciate rupture rises when male dogs have inadequate time to fully hormonally develop and grow healthy bones. The closure of the growth plate is regulated by sex hormones which stops the bones from growing. Without the hormones, bones will continue to grow causing hip or elbow dysplasia. 

#5: Neutering male dogs increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma. The likelihood of developing this common cancer, in the spleen, heart or other organs, in many breeds after neutering rises by a factor of 1.6, with a very poor prognosis.

#6: Male dogs neutered during their first years have a tripled potential for obesity. Similar to humans, overweight dogs are more susceptible to numerous other health problems such as those that affect the joints, thyroid and adrenal glands. 

#7: The originally small risks for prostate and urinary tract cancers increase for neutered male dogs. The risk for urinary tract cancer doubles (<1%) while the risk for prostate cancer quadruples (<0.6%).

#8: The vaccines recommended may result in adverse side effects in neutered male dogs. By decreasing the immune boosting stimulation and protection from the testosterone surges during puberty, negative reactions to vaccinations are more likely to occur. This crucial hormone function is rarely recognized by conventional vets or shelter practices. 

#9: Neutering male dogs may negatively impact their brain health as they age. Testosterone soaks the brain and provides protection from amyloid deposits, protein deposits that clog brain pathways. The risk of progressive geriatric impairments such as dementia rises in neutered male dogs.

#10: For the behavioral symptoms pet parents believe will be helped by neutering male dogs, other negative symptoms in behavior may develop. Studies indicate neutered males are susceptible to anxious or fearful behaviors, excessive separation anxiety, noise phobias, aggression, and undesirable sexual behaviors. Many behavioral issues are not caused by hormones in the body but by harmful ingredients from vaccines (particularly heavy metals), pesticides and other environmental toxicants in the food, air, water, etc.

If you're still confused about neutering your male dog, it's not your fault.

Here's what I suggest: keep your animal intact as long as possible. Take the time to educate yourself, think about your lifestyle, ask your vet questions and then proceed carefully. 

If you have access to a vet who will perform a vasectomy, I suggest you consider this option in lieu of neutering. You can always elect for a full castration years after he has developed bones, immune system, muscles, etc. 

Don't forget to spend time needed for adequate training to ensure they are well socialized and less likely to be a hormonal misfit!

If you MUSneuter your dog, homeopathy can help with some of the potential health issues that could arise.                                                            

Our homeopathic protocol, in a super convenient kit, is tried and true to make a routine but stressful situation easier, with much less pain, and a much faster recovery. Choose your kit for at-home pet care here.  Remember that homeopathic remedies have no shelf life if they are stored correctly- out of direct sunlight and away from electronics and strong smelling herbs.  So, if you are uncertain whether or not you will have to spay/neuter, best to have it on hand just in case!  Learn more about how you can use these amazing remedies for other ailments as well in my Homeopathy Course. 

Homeopathic Support For Neutering

If you have to neuter your dog or cat homeopathic remedies can help! Our Neuter Assist Kit can help for a smooth surgery and recovery. PRICE: $75

Here's how other countries view neutering male dogs:

It's useful to know what is possible for your animals if you choose to delay or forgo the surgeries.

In many European countries, dogs are much better behaved overall than our American dogs. Part of this includes an unspoken rule about ignoring other people's dogs. Children are taught early to not "distract the dog." Dogs are everywhere with their humans and rarely interact with other dogs or people when they are sitting for an espresso (the human, that is), or walking down a street. It's a lovely sort of dance where dogs are closely attached to the human and just go about the business of their human without fuss or bother.

Most of those animals are not hormonally "altered" and seem to maintain harmony without over-population. Now, that's what I call a great dog society! 

If you have access to a vet who will preform a vasectomy, I suggest you consider this. If you do not, the Parsemus Foundation can help you and your vet get educated.

Here's what you need to know about what can happen when testosterone producing glands are removed from male dogs:

Recent information has shown the removal of the testosterone producing glands (testes) inhibit a feedback loop in the brain (pituitary) to actually increase luteinizing hormone, which has been potentially associated in non-cancerous and cancerous diseases. One of the mechanisms for the risk of cancer increasing could be more clearly understood now in neutered dogs.

It has been my experience in this profession (now over 4 decades) that dogs and cats spayed and neutered much later in life or not at all, along with natural rearing choices, can live a much, much healthier, longer life! 

To learn more about the consequences of spaying your female dog, please, read 10 Good Reasons You Should Not Spay Your Female Dog.

24 comments

Kulmohan Kaur

Kulmohan Kaur

Hi doctor

I took my 3 years old dog for neutering today but was put off by the barking noises of other dogs who seemed to either be in pain or missing their owners .

I decided to rethink and then came across your article. You’ve made me sit up and reconsider our decision to neuter him, mostly because my daughter is afraid he’ll get cancer etc. As such he is very well behaved but somehow is behaving sad and sits at the balcony or just keeps sleeping all day. He marks his territory often and is aggressive when he sees unfamiliar dogs but otherwise he’s good.

Not sure if I should go for neutering even now but at least I have the facts laid down in front of me.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Yes, now you have some additional facts to consider that are often not shared or known by other vets. Maybe your daughter should read the post.

Thanks for taking the time to research health choices for your dog!!

Hi doctor

I took my 3 years old dog for neutering today but was put off by the barking noises of other dogs who seemed to either be in pain or missing their owners .

I decided to rethink and then came across your article. You’ve made me sit up and reconsider our decision to neuter him, mostly because my daughter is afraid he’ll get cancer etc. As such he is very well behaved but somehow is behaving sad and sits at the balcony or just keeps sleeping all day. He marks his territory often and is aggressive when he sees unfamiliar dogs but otherwise he’s good.

Not sure if I should go for neutering even now but at least I have the facts laid down in front of me.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Yes, now you have some additional facts to consider that are often not shared or known by other vets. Maybe your daughter should read the post.

Thanks for taking the time to research health choices for your dog!!

J

J

I am in awe of how many vets use spay/neuter as a treatment for nearly anything. If I went into a doctor with complaint of (insert ailment here) let’s say trouble urinating; if there first idea for treatment was orchidectomy – I’d be firing my doctor. Fortunately my vet seems to respect my choice not to neuter any of the dogs I’ve had in my adult life. Now if I could get my mother in law on board.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
It has become such a mantra that most folks accept it as standard operating procedures! Thank goodness you are not buying that party line, Jason!

I am in awe of how many vets use spay/neuter as a treatment for nearly anything. If I went into a doctor with complaint of (insert ailment here) let’s say trouble urinating; if there first idea for treatment was orchidectomy – I’d be firing my doctor. Fortunately my vet seems to respect my choice not to neuter any of the dogs I’ve had in my adult life. Now if I could get my mother in law on board.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
It has become such a mantra that most folks accept it as standard operating procedures! Thank goodness you are not buying that party line, Jason!

Cristina Pereira

Cristina Pereira

How about dogs that hump? How do you help that? I have a 13 week old male golden and he is already starting to hump. I know it’s because of excitement. I thought neutering helped with humping. Thank you!
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Cristina,

That is a super good question. Neutering doesn’t always stop any sort of behavior like that, contrary to popular believe. Sometimes it can, often it can’t.

Make sure you are working with a good trainer who does positive training now so you can mitigate the behavior.

Also, just think about this – at 13 weeks he is not sexually mature. The hormones aren’t really developed, the testicles haven’t descended, so the cause for his early humping isn’t likely from the hormones.

Dr Dee

How about dogs that hump? How do you help that? I have a 13 week old male golden and he is already starting to hump. I know it’s because of excitement. I thought neutering helped with humping. Thank you!
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Cristina,

That is a super good question. Neutering doesn’t always stop any sort of behavior like that, contrary to popular believe. Sometimes it can, often it can’t.

Make sure you are working with a good trainer who does positive training now so you can mitigate the behavior.

Also, just think about this – at 13 weeks he is not sexually mature. The hormones aren’t really developed, the testicles haven’t descended, so the cause for his early humping isn’t likely from the hormones.

Dr Dee

Tessa

Tessa

Many thanks for this article. In the UK we come under enormous pressure to castrate male dogs by 12 months. I heard a very good documentary on BBC radio , by a veterinary surgeon arguing against it. Delighted to read that you are also of the same mind, and give reasons to support this ( so I can show my family). My boy will be keeping his testicles until he’s at least 2!
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Thank you for your note, Tessa, and for keeping us up to date on happenings in the UK.

Please stay tuned for 3 new blogs on the current research about neutering and spaying.

Best, Dr Dee

Many thanks for this article. In the UK we come under enormous pressure to castrate male dogs by 12 months. I heard a very good documentary on BBC radio , by a veterinary surgeon arguing against it. Delighted to read that you are also of the same mind, and give reasons to support this ( so I can show my family). My boy will be keeping his testicles until he’s at least 2!
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Thank you for your note, Tessa, and for keeping us up to date on happenings in the UK.

Please stay tuned for 3 new blogs on the current research about neutering and spaying.

Best, Dr Dee

Zerxes Ginwalla

Zerxes Ginwalla

Dear Doctor,
We have a lovely 21 month old Cockapoo male. In the last few months he is showing signs of aggression towards other young males. Sometimes he is fine other times it is as if there is flick of a switch and he wants to snap. We feel it is the testosterone in the adolescent boy or he thinks he is protecting us. He is fine with females and older males and will go up and lick and play with them.
He is more like his birth Mum – a Cocker Spaniel and loves to chew & bite on things through the day. He does suffer from Separation Anxiety and will pine for us if we are out and one of us steps into a shop.
We really do not wish to neuter him and vax him.
I am a Homeopath myself and am happy to pay for the service and advice. Belladonna, Aconite and possibly testosterone come to mind as remedies. Thanks in advance

———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Hello fellow Doctor!

The first thing I think of is not the hormones, but I would first consider vaccines, esp the rabies vaccine, which I trust you have given???

If that is the case, then vaccinosis remedies are more in line first – Thuja, Sil, Sulph, etc…

And certainly, that ’snap’ behavior could be what I call ‘brain on fire’, from the vaccines.

Just some thoughts…..

Dear Doctor,
We have a lovely 21 month old Cockapoo male. In the last few months he is showing signs of aggression towards other young males. Sometimes he is fine other times it is as if there is flick of a switch and he wants to snap. We feel it is the testosterone in the adolescent boy or he thinks he is protecting us. He is fine with females and older males and will go up and lick and play with them.
He is more like his birth Mum – a Cocker Spaniel and loves to chew & bite on things through the day. He does suffer from Separation Anxiety and will pine for us if we are out and one of us steps into a shop.
We really do not wish to neuter him and vax him.
I am a Homeopath myself and am happy to pay for the service and advice. Belladonna, Aconite and possibly testosterone come to mind as remedies. Thanks in advance

———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Hello fellow Doctor!

The first thing I think of is not the hormones, but I would first consider vaccines, esp the rabies vaccine, which I trust you have given???

If that is the case, then vaccinosis remedies are more in line first – Thuja, Sil, Sulph, etc…

And certainly, that ’snap’ behavior could be what I call ‘brain on fire’, from the vaccines.

Just some thoughts…..

Mona

Mona

We have almost 3 yr old Cockapoo , and he was diagnosed to have hip displacia. Doc here suggested hip surgery to remove some part of his hip join bone. As we see , his right thigh has very weak think muscle as compared to left one. He is active but often picks his right leg up while running or walking.
Now a vet has suggested that if we get him neutered his hip displacia will get better and his hind leg muscles will grow better too.

———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Hello Mona!

Oh my gosh. For one thing – you should not neuter your dog now or maybe never. Leave those hormones intact and if a situation comes up that you must remove the testicles then maybe, maybe do it. But, you should really stay tuned to my newsletter if you are not because I have a new blog coming out very soon on this issue. Sign up here <https://drdeeblanco.com/> if you have not.

Now, for the hip dysplasia – They probably want to remove the head, the round part of the femur ( which is the long bone in our leg that fits into the socket in our pelvis). It’s actually unusual for a little dog like this to have that kind of serious hip dysplasia.

I would get a second opinion before doing any surgery. He might need joint supplement support or other treatments (homeopathy, acupuncture, herbs, etc) but consider surgery as the last resort.

Get that second opinion!! And don’t neuter!!

Dr Dee

We have almost 3 yr old Cockapoo , and he was diagnosed to have hip displacia. Doc here suggested hip surgery to remove some part of his hip join bone. As we see , his right thigh has very weak think muscle as compared to left one. He is active but often picks his right leg up while running or walking.
Now a vet has suggested that if we get him neutered his hip displacia will get better and his hind leg muscles will grow better too.

———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Hello Mona!

Oh my gosh. For one thing – you should not neuter your dog now or maybe never. Leave those hormones intact and if a situation comes up that you must remove the testicles then maybe, maybe do it. But, you should really stay tuned to my newsletter if you are not because I have a new blog coming out very soon on this issue. Sign up here <https://drdeeblanco.com/> if you have not.

Now, for the hip dysplasia – They probably want to remove the head, the round part of the femur ( which is the long bone in our leg that fits into the socket in our pelvis). It’s actually unusual for a little dog like this to have that kind of serious hip dysplasia.

I would get a second opinion before doing any surgery. He might need joint supplement support or other treatments (homeopathy, acupuncture, herbs, etc) but consider surgery as the last resort.

Get that second opinion!! And don’t neuter!!

Dr Dee

Charles

Charles

I’m so confused so many doctors / vets say everything opposite then what I read here .. I have a 16 month old Dachshund and half the vets and trainers say to do it and the other half day no 🤦🏻🤦🏻🤦🏻 I give up NO ONE KNOWS THE TRUTH
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Chalres,

Yes, I understand how it could be confusing. As a holistic vet I do tend to question more than the common narratives when I see animals not thriving. I question the prevailing beliefs and practices when I see epidemics of illness in neutered animals compared with other countries where neutering is almost shunned.

I would suggest Charles, that you stay tuned as I have a new blog (maybe 2) with the most recent analysis of different breeds, different sizes and different types of neutering (or not), and their effect on joint issues, cancer and behavior.

These recent reports, the conclusions and suggestions you read from the data of a meta analysis was the most current info at that time and caused controversy because standards of practice did not agree. Just because something doesn’t agree with what is best for the animals, does not make it wrong.

The vet who put the latest analysis together, Dr. Benjamin Hart, beseeched his fellow vets to look carefully at their data and reevaluate the current practices!! I didn’t need that data to evaluate what I was seeing in my practice, but that information has helped me completely validate what I was seeing.

Obviously, there are many reasons why animals come down with cancer, fracture cruciate ligaments, etc, but there is a clear association to the length of time the gonadal hormones are left intact and these issues that are dominating pet health.

Hope this helps! Dr Dee

I’m so confused so many doctors / vets say everything opposite then what I read here .. I have a 16 month old Dachshund and half the vets and trainers say to do it and the other half day no 🤦🏻🤦🏻🤦🏻 I give up NO ONE KNOWS THE TRUTH
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Chalres,

Yes, I understand how it could be confusing. As a holistic vet I do tend to question more than the common narratives when I see animals not thriving. I question the prevailing beliefs and practices when I see epidemics of illness in neutered animals compared with other countries where neutering is almost shunned.

I would suggest Charles, that you stay tuned as I have a new blog (maybe 2) with the most recent analysis of different breeds, different sizes and different types of neutering (or not), and their effect on joint issues, cancer and behavior.

These recent reports, the conclusions and suggestions you read from the data of a meta analysis was the most current info at that time and caused controversy because standards of practice did not agree. Just because something doesn’t agree with what is best for the animals, does not make it wrong.

The vet who put the latest analysis together, Dr. Benjamin Hart, beseeched his fellow vets to look carefully at their data and reevaluate the current practices!! I didn’t need that data to evaluate what I was seeing in my practice, but that information has helped me completely validate what I was seeing.

Obviously, there are many reasons why animals come down with cancer, fracture cruciate ligaments, etc, but there is a clear association to the length of time the gonadal hormones are left intact and these issues that are dominating pet health.

Hope this helps! Dr Dee

Matt

Matt

Hi it’s Matt again. Thanks for the reply Doc. In regard to his breed, he is 50% husky and 50% shiba inu. He is 20 months old and 20kg. I know the husky can be prone to hip issues so I suppose that part goes along with your suggestion to not neuter for now. I will definitely wait for his second birthday before I assess his behaviours again. My preference has always been to not neuter, it is just a struggle right now with these recent behaviours that have popped up. Do you think he will grow out of the roaming and the posturing/stiffness with males once his hormones settle at 2 years old?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Well, I can’t really say, nor can anyone, if his posturing and roaming will improve. Some animals will be less inclined and others won’t change at all. Sorry to be so vague but I do think it’s super important to spend time training him and also making sure you have a collar with your contact info should someone pick him up – like animal control.

Roaming is not something most in our societies would condone in an intact animal. You could be considered one of those pet parents who are not responsible for their dog. So, if you are going to keep him intact then you really need to make sure he is not wandering. It will be worth it to keep him safe and under your control, and helping insure his overall health by keeping him intact longer.

Best, Dr Dee

> On Feb 28, 2023, at 8:15 PM, Sunny@comment.sunnysideth >

Hi it’s Matt again. Thanks for the reply Doc. In regard to his breed, he is 50% husky and 50% shiba inu. He is 20 months old and 20kg. I know the husky can be prone to hip issues so I suppose that part goes along with your suggestion to not neuter for now. I will definitely wait for his second birthday before I assess his behaviours again. My preference has always been to not neuter, it is just a struggle right now with these recent behaviours that have popped up. Do you think he will grow out of the roaming and the posturing/stiffness with males once his hormones settle at 2 years old?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Well, I can’t really say, nor can anyone, if his posturing and roaming will improve. Some animals will be less inclined and others won’t change at all. Sorry to be so vague but I do think it’s super important to spend time training him and also making sure you have a collar with your contact info should someone pick him up – like animal control.

Roaming is not something most in our societies would condone in an intact animal. You could be considered one of those pet parents who are not responsible for their dog. So, if you are going to keep him intact then you really need to make sure he is not wandering. It will be worth it to keep him safe and under your control, and helping insure his overall health by keeping him intact longer.

Best, Dr Dee

> On Feb 28, 2023, at 8:15 PM, Sunny@comment.sunnysideth >

Matt

Matt

Hi doc. I’m actually British if that counts as European and dogs are not that well behaved here! But aside that I wanted to ask your opinion on my dog’s situation. I have always wanted him to have his testicles as it’s natural. However he recently turned 18 months old and has started to develop three behaviours which were not present before:
1. Restless – up early every day and constantly wanting to be out. Also licks his penis a lot.
2. Roaming – he had good recall but now has these episodes where he runs away.
3. Fighting – I would not say aggression as it’s not usually him instigating. It is more I think that other dogs smell is testosterone, then this stiff posturing starts, then a fight breaks out.

According to my research these can all be symptoms of a dog producing too much testosterone and needing to be neutered. However a lot of research also says they are symptoms of adolescence. What do you think? Should I give him the chance to grow out of it? Maybe wait until he’s 2 years old and then see if he is still being this way, as I hear 2 years is the cut off for adolescent hormonal flurries? If I just leave it will all these behaviours die down as he becomes an adult?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Hi Matt!

Thanks for your note! Actually, since Europe is not one small country I do think there are many areas where dogs are not well behaved – just like the people!

I don’t know what breed your dog is but I have a brand new analysis coming out in a blog very, very soon which might help you look at the current information regarding behavior. Turns out that what we always thought about neutering dogs, esp male dogs, and it improving their behaviors isn’t the case! The info just out in January this year shows the opposite data. The dogs that were the most aggressive and had nuisance behaviors were the neutered dogs! And you might be actually already seeing that with the dogs attacking him, not the other way around.

Hang on for a little bit and make sure you dig deep into that blog and another one I am posting about arthritis disease and cancer in neutered/spayed, vs intact, vs vasectomy/ovary-sparying spays. There is a lot of very specific info in there.

But, what I can suggest is that you wait for at least 2 years to consider neutering. If you look at the overall health benefits esp. of the joints (hip dysplasia and cruciate ligament tears) and your dog is greater than 22kg then it behoves you to not neuter, but to wait. And maybe never neuter. I see so many joint issues that it’s really an epidemic. Early neutering has been an issue for me (in that I don’t agree with it) because you cannot reverse it and these dogs really suffer needlessly with joint issues almost all their lives.

And, of course that requires you to really be on your game to care for and manage him around other dogs.

At the very least wait until you get all the current info and know that you are doing the best for your dog.

Hope this helps! Dr Dee

Hi doc. I’m actually British if that counts as European and dogs are not that well behaved here! But aside that I wanted to ask your opinion on my dog’s situation. I have always wanted him to have his testicles as it’s natural. However he recently turned 18 months old and has started to develop three behaviours which were not present before:
1. Restless – up early every day and constantly wanting to be out. Also licks his penis a lot.
2. Roaming – he had good recall but now has these episodes where he runs away.
3. Fighting – I would not say aggression as it’s not usually him instigating. It is more I think that other dogs smell is testosterone, then this stiff posturing starts, then a fight breaks out.

According to my research these can all be symptoms of a dog producing too much testosterone and needing to be neutered. However a lot of research also says they are symptoms of adolescence. What do you think? Should I give him the chance to grow out of it? Maybe wait until he’s 2 years old and then see if he is still being this way, as I hear 2 years is the cut off for adolescent hormonal flurries? If I just leave it will all these behaviours die down as he becomes an adult?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Hi Matt!

Thanks for your note! Actually, since Europe is not one small country I do think there are many areas where dogs are not well behaved – just like the people!

I don’t know what breed your dog is but I have a brand new analysis coming out in a blog very, very soon which might help you look at the current information regarding behavior. Turns out that what we always thought about neutering dogs, esp male dogs, and it improving their behaviors isn’t the case! The info just out in January this year shows the opposite data. The dogs that were the most aggressive and had nuisance behaviors were the neutered dogs! And you might be actually already seeing that with the dogs attacking him, not the other way around.

Hang on for a little bit and make sure you dig deep into that blog and another one I am posting about arthritis disease and cancer in neutered/spayed, vs intact, vs vasectomy/ovary-sparying spays. There is a lot of very specific info in there.

But, what I can suggest is that you wait for at least 2 years to consider neutering. If you look at the overall health benefits esp. of the joints (hip dysplasia and cruciate ligament tears) and your dog is greater than 22kg then it behoves you to not neuter, but to wait. And maybe never neuter. I see so many joint issues that it’s really an epidemic. Early neutering has been an issue for me (in that I don’t agree with it) because you cannot reverse it and these dogs really suffer needlessly with joint issues almost all their lives.

And, of course that requires you to really be on your game to care for and manage him around other dogs.

At the very least wait until you get all the current info and know that you are doing the best for your dog.

Hope this helps! Dr Dee

William craun

William craun

Hi I have a pit/lab mix 5 years old still intact Other getting lectured to by my vet a few times a year about wanting to neuter my dog and the dog catching a scent of a female in heat a couple times a year and dragging me to that scent every day until it goes away , I love the way he looks and what that testosterone seems to be providing him. He has had this small amount bleeding around his butt only after he poops almost since he was several months old It’s not in his feces and he is otherwise healthy and eats good . The vet had to sedate him very heavily to be able to to express his anal glands as he gets upset and check them for I infection. They were ok but he noticed a polyp just inside the anus . He wants to put him under heavy anesthesia to remove this polyp and also neuter him whine he’s out I told him definitely no neuter ! Is there anything I just be concerned with this polyp extraction. Also you mention brain on fire a lot with the rabies vaccination 1) How can this be avoided when it required by law to get an annual license tag ? 2) what about the heart worm and flea and tic medication they push Is there an alternative for that? Thank you so much
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
William,

I can’t respond to all of your questions. You really need a holistic vet to work with specifically about your dog and options for natural medicine treatments.

But, you have a few things going on with him. A polyp can be an indicator of a vaccine reaction, so working with a homeopathic vet who understands these issues would be the best. I would suggest you do this as soon as you can so that the situation does not get worse – esp. if you have to vaccinate again, which is not a good choice considering he already has shown a propensity to growths.

Anytime there are growths, esp in this area of the body, any vaccine can make them grow and make them grow in other places. This has been known for 200 years in the homeopathic community of practitioners.

Hope this helps, Dr Dee

Hi I have a pit/lab mix 5 years old still intact Other getting lectured to by my vet a few times a year about wanting to neuter my dog and the dog catching a scent of a female in heat a couple times a year and dragging me to that scent every day until it goes away , I love the way he looks and what that testosterone seems to be providing him. He has had this small amount bleeding around his butt only after he poops almost since he was several months old It’s not in his feces and he is otherwise healthy and eats good . The vet had to sedate him very heavily to be able to to express his anal glands as he gets upset and check them for I infection. They were ok but he noticed a polyp just inside the anus . He wants to put him under heavy anesthesia to remove this polyp and also neuter him whine he’s out I told him definitely no neuter ! Is there anything I just be concerned with this polyp extraction. Also you mention brain on fire a lot with the rabies vaccination 1) How can this be avoided when it required by law to get an annual license tag ? 2) what about the heart worm and flea and tic medication they push Is there an alternative for that? Thank you so much
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
William,

I can’t respond to all of your questions. You really need a holistic vet to work with specifically about your dog and options for natural medicine treatments.

But, you have a few things going on with him. A polyp can be an indicator of a vaccine reaction, so working with a homeopathic vet who understands these issues would be the best. I would suggest you do this as soon as you can so that the situation does not get worse – esp. if you have to vaccinate again, which is not a good choice considering he already has shown a propensity to growths.

Anytime there are growths, esp in this area of the body, any vaccine can make them grow and make them grow in other places. This has been known for 200 years in the homeopathic community of practitioners.

Hope this helps, Dr Dee

Kayla

Kayla

I have a 8 month old standard golden doodle. He can be very playful and has a huge appetite. His weight is roughly 50 pounds. I take him to our small private dog park for exercise a few times a week, but he’s mostly in doors or lays out on the patio. I took him to the Vet on Monday and they gave him the remainder of his vaccines that they recommended, I was a bit late on getting them all. They won’t groom him unless he has them and this is my first dog. I have noticed he is a bit more hyper than normal. I’m 3 months pregnant and the vet strongly suggested that I get him neutered. I never understood why that was necessary because it just seems like something that is more convenient for the dog parent than the actual dog himself. I am worried about him jumping on me accidentally and potentially causing me harm, do you have any suggestions that may help? He only gets this excited with me, he doesn’t display this behavior with my husband.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Kayla – this could be a typical reaction to vaccines. Esp. if they gave the rabies vaccine. I am not sure how to say this, but many people think that bad training (and you could be accused of this since I don’t know how much or how little you have trained your dog) is the cause of bad behavior. But, what many folks don’t realize is that vaccines are loaded with many toxicants that can go to the brain and cause what I call ‘brain on fire’ – this can cause all sorts of strange behaviors the animals didn’t have before.

I realize groomers are super paranoid these days about requiring vaccinations, but look further – you might be able to find a groomer that comes to your house.

If you stay in that model of vaccinating to comply with ‘rules’ that can harm your dog you won’t be happy.

The fact he still has some hormones has actually protected his brain, his joints and other tissues, as you read on the blog. Don’t neuter him until you research Detox <https://drdeeblanco.com/blogs/news/why-is-it-important-to-detox-your-pets?pos=1&psq=detox&ss=e&v=1.0> here and here <https://drdeeblanco.com/blogs/news/detoxification-for-dogs-and-cats?pos=2&psq=detox&ss=e&v=1.0> and training him. I know you don’t want to give him up or harm him with other toxicants and early neutering.

There is no fast, easy solution now. But, if you love your dog, and I know you do, keep making the effort to give him the longest, vital life you can.

Hope this helps, Kayla! Dr Dee

I have a 8 month old standard golden doodle. He can be very playful and has a huge appetite. His weight is roughly 50 pounds. I take him to our small private dog park for exercise a few times a week, but he’s mostly in doors or lays out on the patio. I took him to the Vet on Monday and they gave him the remainder of his vaccines that they recommended, I was a bit late on getting them all. They won’t groom him unless he has them and this is my first dog. I have noticed he is a bit more hyper than normal. I’m 3 months pregnant and the vet strongly suggested that I get him neutered. I never understood why that was necessary because it just seems like something that is more convenient for the dog parent than the actual dog himself. I am worried about him jumping on me accidentally and potentially causing me harm, do you have any suggestions that may help? He only gets this excited with me, he doesn’t display this behavior with my husband.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Kayla – this could be a typical reaction to vaccines. Esp. if they gave the rabies vaccine. I am not sure how to say this, but many people think that bad training (and you could be accused of this since I don’t know how much or how little you have trained your dog) is the cause of bad behavior. But, what many folks don’t realize is that vaccines are loaded with many toxicants that can go to the brain and cause what I call ‘brain on fire’ – this can cause all sorts of strange behaviors the animals didn’t have before.

I realize groomers are super paranoid these days about requiring vaccinations, but look further – you might be able to find a groomer that comes to your house.

If you stay in that model of vaccinating to comply with ‘rules’ that can harm your dog you won’t be happy.

The fact he still has some hormones has actually protected his brain, his joints and other tissues, as you read on the blog. Don’t neuter him until you research Detox <https://drdeeblanco.com/blogs/news/why-is-it-important-to-detox-your-pets?pos=1&psq=detox&ss=e&v=1.0> here and here <https://drdeeblanco.com/blogs/news/detoxification-for-dogs-and-cats?pos=2&psq=detox&ss=e&v=1.0> and training him. I know you don’t want to give him up or harm him with other toxicants and early neutering.

There is no fast, easy solution now. But, if you love your dog, and I know you do, keep making the effort to give him the longest, vital life you can.

Hope this helps, Kayla! Dr Dee

Missie

Missie

This was very insightful…thank you!
I have a 1yr old Boxer who is super friendly but now I’m wondering and keep hearing that I should get him neutered due to cancer risk and ability to go to dog parks which I use as his exercise…I don’t want to but I see that a vasectomy is an option, thanks for that info

This was very insightful…thank you!
I have a 1yr old Boxer who is super friendly but now I’m wondering and keep hearing that I should get him neutered due to cancer risk and ability to go to dog parks which I use as his exercise…I don’t want to but I see that a vasectomy is an option, thanks for that info

Rain

Rain

We have a intact 20 month old German Shepard male we are discussing neutering him or vasectomy he has showed aggressive behavior towards a fixed male and outside people wouldn’t neutering him help with this. Ps he has not received any vaccinations or heart worm/ tick or flea medication.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
So good to hear you have kept him clean from toxins injected, applied or orally given! Often I find these animals are more aggressive, especially the ones who have had a rabies vaccine.

But, that aggression we often see after a rabies vaccine can be passed down from a parent(s). And with German Shepherd Dog’s, we’ll, you know, they were bred for protection. This tendency still runs through that breed.

So, neutering might help a little bit, but it will never make him into a compliant Labrador. I would not count on neutering to fix the issue.

It’s great you haven’t added insult to his brain or things could be much worse. Do what you can to keep him free of toxins!

I hope this helps!

We have a intact 20 month old German Shepard male we are discussing neutering him or vasectomy he has showed aggressive behavior towards a fixed male and outside people wouldn’t neutering him help with this. Ps he has not received any vaccinations or heart worm/ tick or flea medication.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
So good to hear you have kept him clean from toxins injected, applied or orally given! Often I find these animals are more aggressive, especially the ones who have had a rabies vaccine.

But, that aggression we often see after a rabies vaccine can be passed down from a parent(s). And with German Shepherd Dog’s, we’ll, you know, they were bred for protection. This tendency still runs through that breed.

So, neutering might help a little bit, but it will never make him into a compliant Labrador. I would not count on neutering to fix the issue.

It’s great you haven’t added insult to his brain or things could be much worse. Do what you can to keep him free of toxins!

I hope this helps!

Reet

Reet

Wll neutering my male dog help in removing his habit of humping? Wll he become more social and tolerant of people?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Yes, it is possible it will help him to be more socially adapted. The humping might improve, but not always the other more aggressive behaviors.

Those sorts of behaviors can also come from inflammation of the brain, what I call Brain On Fire, from vaccinations, especially from the rabies vaccine.

Wll neutering my male dog help in removing his habit of humping? Wll he become more social and tolerant of people?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Yes, it is possible it will help him to be more socially adapted. The humping might improve, but not always the other more aggressive behaviors.

Those sorts of behaviors can also come from inflammation of the brain, what I call Brain On Fire, from vaccinations, especially from the rabies vaccine.

Michelle Jones

Michelle Jones

This article has been so insightful! I am considering adopting a 4-yr-old male golden retriever that’s been used – yes USED – for breeding. He is being retired and I HATE where this guy has had to live!! I can see in the photos how much love he needs & wants to give! I have had two goldens before & they are the best gentle breeds that thrive in loving environments! I have two small yorkies and I worry about him having any aggressive behavior & poor habits because of being bred – probably lots of times!! It breaks my heart & I want to go rescue him!! I am worried about the fact that he’s never been given a “home,” and I worry about bad habits. I was researching whether or not to have him neutered if I get him. I want him to live a long healthy, happy life!! I need some prayers & happy thoughts that I make a good decision for me, my pets & him. Any Insight?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Hi Michelle!

Why not just adopt this guy that has found his way into your heart and just see how it goes? Talk with him about what you expect from him in regards to his behavior and fitting into the house. Ask him if he wants to come to your home. Ask him if he needs emotional support to let you know asap and not ‘act out’ without thinking. You get the idea…and talk to all the other animals too – get a consensus if you can!

And then use flower essences and homeopathy to help him transition into your home. Rescue remedy, homeopathic Ignatia, Aconite (if he’s super scared), lots of other remedies can help too.

And then wait – don’t neuter out of pressure from anyone. It will be a big betrayal to bring him home, offer him a safe place and then take him to the scary vet office! You can do that later.

Give yourself and everyone else time and space needed to adjust and bring in the love!!!

How fun!! So glad you are opening up your heart and your home for this beloved being!!

You’ll have Happy Holidays, I’m sure!!

Dr Dee

This article has been so insightful! I am considering adopting a 4-yr-old male golden retriever that’s been used – yes USED – for breeding. He is being retired and I HATE where this guy has had to live!! I can see in the photos how much love he needs & wants to give! I have had two goldens before & they are the best gentle breeds that thrive in loving environments! I have two small yorkies and I worry about him having any aggressive behavior & poor habits because of being bred – probably lots of times!! It breaks my heart & I want to go rescue him!! I am worried about the fact that he’s never been given a “home,” and I worry about bad habits. I was researching whether or not to have him neutered if I get him. I want him to live a long healthy, happy life!! I need some prayers & happy thoughts that I make a good decision for me, my pets & him. Any Insight?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Hi Michelle!

Why not just adopt this guy that has found his way into your heart and just see how it goes? Talk with him about what you expect from him in regards to his behavior and fitting into the house. Ask him if he wants to come to your home. Ask him if he needs emotional support to let you know asap and not ‘act out’ without thinking. You get the idea…and talk to all the other animals too – get a consensus if you can!

And then use flower essences and homeopathy to help him transition into your home. Rescue remedy, homeopathic Ignatia, Aconite (if he’s super scared), lots of other remedies can help too.

And then wait – don’t neuter out of pressure from anyone. It will be a big betrayal to bring him home, offer him a safe place and then take him to the scary vet office! You can do that later.

Give yourself and everyone else time and space needed to adjust and bring in the love!!!

How fun!! So glad you are opening up your heart and your home for this beloved being!!

You’ll have Happy Holidays, I’m sure!!

Dr Dee

Joyce

Joyce

I am interested in adopting a 2mo. old mixed white terrior. I have just found out that his testicles were removed at this very prime growth period of his life. I have read your facts on the consequences of neutering at such a young age young age. Now I am totally worried about his future of being healthy. Shall I not adopt a young neutered shelter dog because of this issue. It sounds so horrible what they have done to him.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
This is quite a pickle isn’t it Joyce? One that I have struggled with for many decades!

I think if you fell in love with this little one and he you, then adopt him and help him have a wonderful home!! Educate others about this mess we are in and complain to the shelter.

Also, start him on some super clean glandular products and give ongoing support to his joints <https://drdeeblanco.com/products/flex-well?pos=1&psq=flex+&ss=e&v=1.0> as well as Bioplasma  <https://drdeeblanco.com/products/bioplasma-cell-salts?pos=1&psq=bioplasma&ss=e&v=1.0>

There are other things, but these would be a great start and added into the fresh food, no more vaccines, no pesticides your dog will have a long and pretty darn healthy life!! He might need some Detox <https://drdeeblanco.com/products/dr-dees-detox-protocol?pos=2&psq=deto&ss=e&v=1.0> for the vaccines, but you can figure that out soon enough.

Make sure to keep in touch and follow us on FB and IG for a lot more education to come!

So glad you can literally rescue this dog from the ’shelter’!

Dr Dee

I am interested in adopting a 2mo. old mixed white terrior. I have just found out that his testicles were removed at this very prime growth period of his life. I have read your facts on the consequences of neutering at such a young age young age. Now I am totally worried about his future of being healthy. Shall I not adopt a young neutered shelter dog because of this issue. It sounds so horrible what they have done to him.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
This is quite a pickle isn’t it Joyce? One that I have struggled with for many decades!

I think if you fell in love with this little one and he you, then adopt him and help him have a wonderful home!! Educate others about this mess we are in and complain to the shelter.

Also, start him on some super clean glandular products and give ongoing support to his joints <https://drdeeblanco.com/products/flex-well?pos=1&psq=flex+&ss=e&v=1.0> as well as Bioplasma  <https://drdeeblanco.com/products/bioplasma-cell-salts?pos=1&psq=bioplasma&ss=e&v=1.0>

There are other things, but these would be a great start and added into the fresh food, no more vaccines, no pesticides your dog will have a long and pretty darn healthy life!! He might need some Detox <https://drdeeblanco.com/products/dr-dees-detox-protocol?pos=2&psq=deto&ss=e&v=1.0> for the vaccines, but you can figure that out soon enough.

Make sure to keep in touch and follow us on FB and IG for a lot more education to come!

So glad you can literally rescue this dog from the ’shelter’!

Dr Dee

Anne

Anne

This totally makes sense! I’m looking at getting a puppy, and what I’m finding challenging is that most reputable breeders have a clause in their contract that requires the new owner to have their puppy altered within 6 months of purchase (which would make the dog approx. 32 weeks or 8 months old). The only way around that is to register as a breeder yourself and get a special exemption and pay more for the puppy. One breeder I was considering goes so far as to say that the buyer’s ownership of the puppy isn’t considered “final/valid” until the owner provides the breeder proof of spay/neuter. A breeder I instantly ruled out neuters her puppies at 8 weeks old before the owner picks them up. So I guess my question is: How do you find a breeder in the US who won’t force the buyer to alter the puppy after they’ve purchased it?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
First see if you can find naturally reared dogs. Possibly http://www.naturalrearing.com/coda/index.html <http://www.naturalrearing.com/coda/index.html> is a good place to start. There are more and more breeders that are aware of the vaccine dangers; the benefits of fresh food and the dangers of spaying/neutering too early.

Of course, the other way that I prefer is to find a rescue group that isn’t as aggressive about these practices but specialize in the type of dog you are looking for.

Or even better yet, to adopt a dog from an accidental breeding. These dogs can be great animals and sometimes stronger in their genetics because the most dominant characteristics come out, rather than recessive characteristics like the specific color of the eye or coat. I’ve had many clients get these dogs off Craigs List (I know, I know!) and they are super robust dogs! I’ve adopted them myself. Our most recent one was our Husky mix who died in June at 18 years old.

Don’t give up you’ll find your soul mate, and thank you for thinking about this so deeply!

This totally makes sense! I’m looking at getting a puppy, and what I’m finding challenging is that most reputable breeders have a clause in their contract that requires the new owner to have their puppy altered within 6 months of purchase (which would make the dog approx. 32 weeks or 8 months old). The only way around that is to register as a breeder yourself and get a special exemption and pay more for the puppy. One breeder I was considering goes so far as to say that the buyer’s ownership of the puppy isn’t considered “final/valid” until the owner provides the breeder proof of spay/neuter. A breeder I instantly ruled out neuters her puppies at 8 weeks old before the owner picks them up. So I guess my question is: How do you find a breeder in the US who won’t force the buyer to alter the puppy after they’ve purchased it?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
First see if you can find naturally reared dogs. Possibly http://www.naturalrearing.com/coda/index.html <http://www.naturalrearing.com/coda/index.html> is a good place to start. There are more and more breeders that are aware of the vaccine dangers; the benefits of fresh food and the dangers of spaying/neutering too early.

Of course, the other way that I prefer is to find a rescue group that isn’t as aggressive about these practices but specialize in the type of dog you are looking for.

Or even better yet, to adopt a dog from an accidental breeding. These dogs can be great animals and sometimes stronger in their genetics because the most dominant characteristics come out, rather than recessive characteristics like the specific color of the eye or coat. I’ve had many clients get these dogs off Craigs List (I know, I know!) and they are super robust dogs! I’ve adopted them myself. Our most recent one was our Husky mix who died in June at 18 years old.

Don’t give up you’ll find your soul mate, and thank you for thinking about this so deeply!

Lynn Whinery

Lynn Whinery

I’ve bred Australian Shepherds for 30 years. For the last 20 we’ve fed a raw diet, with no vaccines. Unfortunately, one of my males produced a litter of puppies that all had cataracts, despite not being an HC carrier. (There are several types of cataracts, unfortunately.) So anyway, we had him neutered at 5 years of age, so we didn’t risk any ‘oops’ litters. Guess what? It didn’t get rid of any ‘macho’ behaviors people tell you it will do, AND, he’s now overweight! People try to tell you there’s no link, but there definitely is. Attitudes need to change in the U.S., and people need to learn how to have well behaved dogs in public, like they do in other countries.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Thank you for sharing, Lynn!

I’ve bred Australian Shepherds for 30 years. For the last 20 we’ve fed a raw diet, with no vaccines. Unfortunately, one of my males produced a litter of puppies that all had cataracts, despite not being an HC carrier. (There are several types of cataracts, unfortunately.) So anyway, we had him neutered at 5 years of age, so we didn’t risk any ‘oops’ litters. Guess what? It didn’t get rid of any ‘macho’ behaviors people tell you it will do, AND, he’s now overweight! People try to tell you there’s no link, but there definitely is. Attitudes need to change in the U.S., and people need to learn how to have well behaved dogs in public, like they do in other countries.
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
Thank you for sharing, Lynn!

JenesisX

JenesisX

Thank you. I lost my last dog to cardiac hemangiosarcoma. Reading that neutering can increase the risk of that cancer made my decision about neutering my new dog. He won’t be getting altered, I won’t take that risk.

Thank you. I lost my last dog to cardiac hemangiosarcoma. Reading that neutering can increase the risk of that cancer made my decision about neutering my new dog. He won’t be getting altered, I won’t take that risk.

Tama

Tama

Thank you. This is a good read.

Thank you. This is a good read.

Deborah Tillman

Deborah Tillman

Caroline, I have had many dogs over the years, small and large. My two closest to me, rather than family dogs were Shepards, one German and my current boy is a White Swiss. I never had any males neutered except a cocker spaniel. He was out of control and humped everything and everyone. I was told that neutering would calm him down. It totally did not, in fact he became more anxious, and still humped everything and everyone. He also became snappy. My current fur baby (Swiss Shepherd) is now 4 years old and intact. He has never humped anything and loves other animals. Vet tried to convince me to neuter as a puppy but breeder was totally against the whole idea with a litany of reasons. My advise is do your own research. What vets tell you tends to be universal advise across all breeds, but what ok for one breed is not for the next. Kinda like docs for people who put you in the boxes they checked and then use that for treatment but your in the 20% that didn’t fit into the 80% of those who fit their box check off. Good luck!!!

Caroline, I have had many dogs over the years, small and large. My two closest to me, rather than family dogs were Shepards, one German and my current boy is a White Swiss. I never had any males neutered except a cocker spaniel. He was out of control and humped everything and everyone. I was told that neutering would calm him down. It totally did not, in fact he became more anxious, and still humped everything and everyone. He also became snappy. My current fur baby (Swiss Shepherd) is now 4 years old and intact. He has never humped anything and loves other animals. Vet tried to convince me to neuter as a puppy but breeder was totally against the whole idea with a litany of reasons. My advise is do your own research. What vets tell you tends to be universal advise across all breeds, but what ok for one breed is not for the next. Kinda like docs for people who put you in the boxes they checked and then use that for treatment but your in the 20% that didn’t fit into the 80% of those who fit their box check off. Good luck!!!

Caroline

Caroline

I have 2 dachshunds of a year and a half, not the same litter. They have become more aggressive as they have got older. Last night they had a very aggressive fight and it was hard to separate them. Luckily no serious wounds, but now I am terrified to leave them alone together. I try to follow a holistic approach first, but am being told that neutering them will solve the problem?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
This situation could yes be due to fighting over territory, resource guarding over food, attention seeking, dominance, etc, but I also have seen these behaviors worsen after vaccinations. Especially after the rabies vaccines.

You could be dealing with an adverse reaction to the vaccine in one dog and the other dog is trying to hold his line. It might NOT be a hormone issue at all.

I have 2 dachshunds of a year and a half, not the same litter. They have become more aggressive as they have got older. Last night they had a very aggressive fight and it was hard to separate them. Luckily no serious wounds, but now I am terrified to leave them alone together. I try to follow a holistic approach first, but am being told that neutering them will solve the problem?
———
Dr Dee Blanco replied:
This situation could yes be due to fighting over territory, resource guarding over food, attention seeking, dominance, etc, but I also have seen these behaviors worsen after vaccinations. Especially after the rabies vaccines.

You could be dealing with an adverse reaction to the vaccine in one dog and the other dog is trying to hold his line. It might NOT be a hormone issue at all.

Daphne DaSilva

Daphne DaSilva

I have a full-breed German Shepherd. His name is Rex, I spayed him on Monday. He is 3 years old. It was a difficult decision to have him castrated. He is not an aggressive dog, but he does not get along with the 2 new 7months old puppies. He is the father of the puppies. Presently I have a trainer, but Rex’s attitude changes daily. I have to separate them all the time. I figured spaying him would be a positive and not a negative. He is very disciplined, but not friendly with other dogs out of the yard not with my puppies who are males. I also have 2 females that are spayed, which Rex gets along with very well. I work in Boston, Massachusetts, and live in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.
Overall, I have 5 dogs, 2 females and 3 males. Rex, the Alpha male. Any suggestions of what else I should do, to have Rex get along with the 7-month-old puppies?
Best regards,
Daphne

I have a full-breed German Shepherd. His name is Rex, I spayed him on Monday. He is 3 years old. It was a difficult decision to have him castrated. He is not an aggressive dog, but he does not get along with the 2 new 7months old puppies. He is the father of the puppies. Presently I have a trainer, but Rex’s attitude changes daily. I have to separate them all the time. I figured spaying him would be a positive and not a negative. He is very disciplined, but not friendly with other dogs out of the yard not with my puppies who are males. I also have 2 females that are spayed, which Rex gets along with very well. I work in Boston, Massachusetts, and live in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.
Overall, I have 5 dogs, 2 females and 3 males. Rex, the Alpha male. Any suggestions of what else I should do, to have Rex get along with the 7-month-old puppies?
Best regards,
Daphne

ירושלמי שני Shani Yerushalmy

ירושלמי שני Shani Yerushalmy

Thank you

Thank you

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